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Because taking care is the essence of healthcare

Fabienne Ostermeyer, International Development Director, Visiomed Group International Visiocheck is the medical device solution for the professional’s use inside the Bewell Connect ecosystem. It aims at being a problem solver for any health professional involved in rural medicine, remote medicine, emergency operations and isolated population coverage.  It was conceived by listening day after day to medical doctors working in the field of operations, with aid organizations, in assistance missions, emergency doctors, telemedicine operators… Monitor patient health anywhere with this highly versatile technology We allow you to rapidly and simply monitor your patient’s vital signs, as if it were a...

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Agriculture and Food Production as Drivers of the Global Emergence and Dissemination of Antimicrobial Resistance

Professor Ellen Silbergeld,  Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health, USA;  Dr Awa Aidara-Kane, Coordinator Who–Agisar and Jennifer Dailey, Phd Student in Materials Science And Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, USA In 2015, the German Antibiotic Resistance Strategy, DART 2020, was approved by the Federal Cabinet. At the same time, the Global Action Plan on Antimicrobial Resistance was adopted by the World Health Assembly. The provisions of the Global Action Plan were taken into account in the preparation of DART 2020. DART 2020 pursues six objectives. Following the One Health approach, all objectives address human and veterinary medicine equally. Main activities in the human health sector in the coming years are the better integration of the outpatient sector, the provision of information on AMR to the public, the further expansion of surveillance systems, international cooperation and strengthening research. The debate over the importance of antibiotic use in agriculture as a driver of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has been active since the first reports of drug resistance in agricultural settings, which coincided with the first reports of drug resistance in clinical settings.  In order to move forward in developing concerted programmes at local, national and global levels for responding to the crisis in AMR, we need to incorporate state-of-the-art scientific understanding of molecular microbiology as well as the state-of-the-science on AMR selection and dissemination. There are very few differences between the...

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The OIE commitment to overcoming Antimicrobial Resistance and why it is important

Dr Elisabeth Erlacher-Vindel, Head of Science and New Technologies Department, World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE); Professor Jacques Acar, Senior Expert, World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and Professor Emeritus of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Pierre And Marie Curie University and Dr Margot Raicek, Chargée De Mission, Science and New Technologies Department, World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) As the international reference for standards in animal health and welfare, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) considers combating antimicrobial resistance among its priorities. Through the development of codes and manuals for terrestrial and aquatic animals and significant capacity-building initiatives, the OIE supports the responsible and prudent use of antibiotics in animals in its 181 member countries. Towards a One Health approach and following the global action plan on antimicrobial resistance, the OIE collaborates with the World Health Organization (WHO) and Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) through a tripartite partnership, coordinating a unified response to this global issue. For over 90 years, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) has established international sanitary policies, becoming the reference organization for intergovernmental standards in animal health, veterinary public health and animal welfare. Formed in response to a rinderpest (cattle plague) outbreak in Europe, the establishment of the OIE in 1924 demonstrated the necessity for intergovernmental collaboration in combating animal disease. Since then, the OIE has steadily expanded and developed its mandate...

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The Unique Contribution of One Health To Combating Antibiotic Resistance

Dr Steven L Solomon, Director, Global Public Health Consulting, Georgia, USA One Health is the concept that the optimum health for people, animals and the environment can best be ensured through the ongoing cooperative efforts of scientists and practitioners in a variety of disciplines.  Many organizations have committed to the idea that One Health can be an effective approach to addressing complex public health problems, especially antimicrobial resistance. By bringing together experts in many different fields, One Health encourages innovative problem-solving and provides opportunities to enhance the tools and processes on which public health depends for designing, implementing and evaluating disease prevention and control programmes.  One Health surveillance – drawing data from multiple sources and monitoring systems, integrating that data and analyzing and interpreting it in a framework that crosses the domains of human and animal health and environmental science – serves as an example of both the potential benefits as well as the notable challenges in creating and maintaining effective One Health collaborations.   One Health is increasingly recognized as a critical framework for addressing a range of health problems, particularly antimicrobial resistance (AMR); indeed, AMR has been described as the “quintessential” One Health issue (1). One Health has several related definitions, but consistently embodies the concept that optimal health for people, animals and the environment can only be obtained through close collaboration and cooperation among scientists and...

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On The Value of Viewing Antimicrobial Resistance as a threat to International Security

Associate Professor Adam Kamradt-Scott, Centre for International Security Studies; Associate Professor Dale Dominey-Howes, School of Geosciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia and Dr Maurizio Labbate, Senior Lecturer, School of Life Sciences, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia In recent years, antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has been increasingly described as a threat to national and global health security. However the utilization of security terminology in reference to health issues has generally been regarded as a negative development, one that should be avoided. We consider the benefits and drawbacks of utilizing this descriptor, concluding that, on balance it can serve as an important tool in assisting leaders and decision-makers address the complex challenge that AMR presents. Until the end of the cold war, adverse health events such as disease outbreaks rarely gained significant international attention. Instead, the realm of high politics was reserved for such issues as nuclear disarmament, free trade agreements, and intrastate wars (1). During this period, health crises were usually designated by governments as a second order issue and responsibility to respond was normally delegated to their respective health minister and associated ministry. Since the 1990s, however, a series of significant global health events, such as the 2003 SARS outbreak, the spread of H5N1, the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic and most recently, the 2014 West African Ebola outbreak, have repeatedly demonstrated how adverse health events not only cause significant...

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